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Mardi Himal Trekking Route

Mardi Himal is considered to be an ideal introduction to mountaineering in the high Himalaya, particularly if you have limited time available. No previous experience of high altitudes is necessary, as every precaution will be taken to ensure gradual and thorough acclimatization during the trek to the mountain.A major benefit of Mardi Himal is the ability to climb it in a round trip of a little over 2 weeks. It therefore makes a visit to the Himalaya a real possibility for those who hitherto have not been able to find the time to join a longer expedition.

Trek Grading

Moderate

Trek Duration

9 Days

6

Maximum Elevation

5,200m/17,060 ft

Day 1 – Pokhara to Deurali (2100m)
Day 2 – Deurali to Forrest Camp (2600m)
Day 3 – Forrest Camp to Low Camp (3100m)
Day 4 – Low Camp to High Camp (3550m)
Day 5 – High Camp to Forrest Camp
Day 6 – Forrest Camp to New Bridge
Day 7 – New Bridge to Jhinu
Day 8 – Jhinu to Ghandruk
Day 9 – Ghandruk to Pokhara

Day 1) Pokhara to Deurali (2100m)

We will leave Pokhara early in the morning and drive to trailhead, Kande, arriving there within one hour and stop for coffee. The trek from Kande will feel secluded with very few trekkers. The first destination is Australian Camp at 2060m and the trek will include a slow uphill and a bit steeper approaching the camp. We can get early lunch there and head to Potana (1950m) starting with a slight downhill then uphill again to Deurali (2100m). We will arrive at Deurali at around 2:00pm and stay in a lodge.

Day 2 – Deurali to Forrest Camp (2600m)

We will start our trekking from Deurali and head for Forrest Camp. It is a four hours trek with uphill initially to the top of the ridge. There is a section just over half way where the trail drops steeply and then slowly gains height and then meets the ridge leading into the Forrest Camp. There are few lodges where you can enjoy fire and rest for the night.

Day 3 – Forrest Camp to Low Camp (3100m)

About an hour up from Forrest Camp there is a new teahouse called “Rest camp” which can’t be found in the map. The trail leading up to the teahouse is steep at first then slightly less so with total of an hour of trekking. The way to Low Camp includes a jungle with occasional glimpses of Annapurna South after about 3 hours of trekking. The lodges there are quite simple with fire to stay warm in the cold nights.

Day 4 – Low Camp to High Camp (3550m)
The trail from Low Camp starts with a jungle trekking for an hour when the trees will get smaller and you will be able to see the spectacular views of Machhapuchhre ahead and Annapurna South to the left. The trail then advances along a ridge and after around 3 hours of trekking we will arrive at High Camp where we will stay on a nice lodge with separate dining room and fire to keep warm. It is possible to continue trekking along the ridge for another 4 to 5 hours to Mardi Himal Base Camp (4500m) and return to High Camp in around another 4 hours – This makes a long day but there is also a viewpoint about half way.

Day 5 – High Camp to Forrest Camp

On the trail to Forrest Camp you can stop for tea at Low Camp then continue on arriving in around 4 hours.

Day 6 – Forrest Camp to New Bridge

Here you can also take a local route which is narrow with vertigo inducing drops off the side! In two hours you will you can get some tea and continue on to New Bridge where you may stay for the day considering the steep descent which can be demanding for the day. The lodge there are nice with good food.

Day 7 – New Bridge to Jhinu

This is a short days trekking but you can enjoy the hot springs. The trail goes up a little at first, then drops down to cross a small river on a bamboo bridge before climbing steeply up to Jhino, mainly on stone steps. Once you arrive at Jhinu its only a short walk to the quiet and clean hot springs with clear warm water where you can soak yourself and enjoy the rest of the afternoon.

Day 8 – Jhinu to Ghandruk

We can set off early after a breakfast and retrace our steps back down from Jhinu and cross a small bamboo bridge and uphill onto the terraces. You will encounter stone steps and small paths and once you climb up to 750m you will get onto the main path where you will encounter an impressive iron gate and continue on for another half an hour and arrive at “Little Paradise Lodge” offering stunning views all round. After lunch we will press ahead, first downhill and then along the ridge leading to Komrong Deurali. We can take a short break and then trek down to Ghandruk where we will react for the day in a lodge.

Day 9 – Ghandruk to Pokhara

With an early start we can head on down to Pokhara after some breakfast. Within an hour we will encounter Chame where you can either take a Jeep or keep walking towards Pokhara. The road zigzags steeply down towards the Modi Khola, then levels out a bit. Once you reach you will need to show your TIMS and ANCAP permits as you exit the Annapurna Conservation Area and hit the black-topped road back all the way to Pokhara where the trek ends.

Trekkers’ Information Management System (TIMS) has been implemented jointly by Nepal Tourism Board (NTB) and Trekking Agencies’ Association of Nepal (TAAN) to ensure safety and security of trekkers and to control illegal trekking operations. Trekking companies will be asked to furnish personal information of trekkers like their passport numbers, nationality and their contact address and their itinerary. The data will be uploaded in visitors’ database which can be accessed in case of accidents and/or natural calamities in order to inform the concerned institutions about the number of trekkers inside a certain trekking area. TIMS cards should be collected by both Free Individual Trekkers (FITs) and trekkers taking the service of government authorized trekking agencies. Past experiences have revealed that difficulties were seen while carrying out rescue operations during times of accidents and natural calamities. Due to the lack of proper record system of trekkers, rescue and search missions used to face difficulties in spotting the missing trekkers. Based on the data collected through TIMS cards, however, it will be possible to know the position of a trekker in case a rescue operation is needed. The provision of Trekkers’ Information Management System (TIMS) came into effect on January 1, 2008. Since then, the Trekking Agencies Association of Nepal (TAAN) and Nepal Tourism Board (NTB) started recording trekkers’ details and began issuing TIMS Card to trekkers. As per the recent MoU signed by NTB and TAAN, TIMS card is applicable in all trekking areas of the country including restricted areas. Group trekkers will have to pay Blue TIMS cards by paying a fee of Rs 1,000 per person, while FITs have to get Green TIMS cards by paying a fee of Rs 2,000. Similarly, group trekkers from SAARC countries have to pay Rs 300 for TIMS cards, while FITs from the SAARC region have to pay Rs 600 each.